The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Ah yes, it’s Turkey Day and though that means lots of food, football, family, and napping, it is also the day of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Started in 1924, the Parade has been a Thanksgiving tradition for years and includes everything from high school/college marching bands, popular performers and musicians, floats, and of course, the balloons. An interesting fact is that the parade began with live animals, but those were replaced by the balloons in 1927. I’ve always enjoyed watching the parade as the first thing to do on Thanksgiving morning, so I thought I’d share some of my favorite balloons over the years.

Mr. Potato Head!

Nifty fact – The parade was suspended from 1942-1944 because of the helium shortage cause by WWII

Hello Kitty

Nifty Fact – The balloons are inflated the day before on both sides of the American Museum of Natural History in NYC

Spiderman

Nifty Fact – The parade was first televised in 1939.

Fish (a vintage balloon from 1941)

Nifty Fact – From the beginning of the parade until 1933, the balloons were released into the air at the end of the parade. People would get reward money if they found the deflated balloons.

Buzz Lightyear

Nifty Fact – The worse place to view the parade is from Columbus Circle. The winds are high there, so the balloon crews rush through to avoid damaging the balloons.

Arthur

Nifty Fact – The largest balloon ever is Superman. He was over 80 feet tall and debuted in 1939.

Aren’t they fun! Happy Thanksgiving all!!!!

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About missheree

Greetings! I am Sheree, a fashion and costume designer from Miami, FL and Minneapolis, MN respectively. While fabric is my personal medium of choice, I find inspiration is all areas of art and this blog is a representation of that. From fashion to illustration to graphic design to architecture, Sparkleshock is here to do just that - add sparkle to your mind and shock your senses.

Posted on November 26, 2009, in Design-a-licious and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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